Christian Motif in Dracula

Topics: Protestant Reformation, Dracula, Catholic Church Pages: 2 (611 words) Published: September 10, 2014
In Bram’s Stoker’s Dracula (1897), one of the main motifs present throughout the whole piece is Catholicism. Catholicism does not only appear as a motif but also as a major theme in the novel. On the books, Broker was known to be a Protestant, however after releasing his novel Dracula, he was considered of being “a closet Catholic cloaking his dangerous views in a relatively safe literary medium” (Starrs, D. Bruno). Even though the novel portrays Anti-Christian values and beliefs, Bram Stoker was able to use different methods in his novel to show how the Catholic beliefs were useful as a protection towards evil, and to be able to compare the powers between good and evil. Throughout the novel, the reader can plainly notice some of the characters’ transformation from being part of the English Church to a Catholic one. One of the clearest examples is Jonathan Harker, the English Churchman. When he first received the rosary and crucifix from the lady, he had mixed feelings since his church saw those objects as idolatrous. However, the character develops an “obvious social and religious tolerance” (Starrs, D. Bruno) towards the Catholic Church. As Harker returns to Transylvania, he’s the opposite as he first left – instead of being alone, unsure and Protestant, he is now in a group, experienced, and quasi-Catholic.” (Starrs, D. Bruno) There are many instances throughout the novel where Bram Stoker makes an allegory to the Bible. The supernatural being Dracula represents the concept of Satan since his descriptions are resoundingly satanic: when enraged his eyes light like “the flames of hell-fire blazed behind them” (Stoker, Bram) and he flashes a “smile that Judas in hell might be proud of” (Stoker, Bram) One direct allegory to the Bible’s Book of Revelation’s four houses of the apocalypse was when Dracula appeared in a “calèche, with four horses” (Stoker, Bram). Also the use of capitalization of personal pronouns in reference to Dracula, which is generally reserved...

Cited: Bourg Donlon, Eleanor. “A Bite of Theology: The Catholic Aesthetic in Bram Stoker’s Dracula.” AP English Language and Composition. N.p., n.p. Web. 4 Aug. 2014
Starrs, D. Bruno. “Keeping the Faith: Catholicism in Dracula and Its Adaptations.” “AP English Literature and Composition. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Aug. 2014.
Stoker, Bram. Dracula. 1897. Ed Leonard Wolf as The Essential Dracula. New York: Plume, 1993.
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