Martin Luther King Jr. as a Reformer

Topics: Protestant Reformation, Catholic Church, Indulgence Pages: 2 (604 words) Published: January 15, 2014
The reformation was a period beginning when the Roman Catholic Church fell on difficult times. Many Christians in society grew tired of the corrupt clergy and the materialistic church. Reformers sprouted around this time with an attempt to change the way things were heading. These reformers were revolutionists, in support of change, and others were conservatives, in protest of change. Martin Luther was both but, leaning more to one side than another. Although Luther promoted significant religious changes resulting in new Protestant faiths, he was more along the lines of a conservative due to his support of secular rulers, anti-Semitic views, and his limited changes to Church practices.

As a revolutionary leader, Martin Luther sought changes concerning social issues, such as how salvation is achieved and his protest to the selling of indulgences. Although he was mainly a revolutionist focusing on social matters, there were few political issues he wanted to change; including his promotion of a government ruled secularly. Luther believed that all should listen to the Bible’s original stories and teachings and not the interpretations that the church was providing for the public. He called this “Sola Scriptura,” which means, solely through the scripture. Luther supported his claim of “Sole Fide,” which means, one can reach salvation through faith alone. He thought that if one purchased an indulgence, a pardon from all sins to help reach salvation, not only is one fooling themselves, but one is also giving unnecessary money to the church. Luther also supported the clergy in marriage. He himself had married a nun, and created seven children. Additionally, Martin Luther had influenced many to question the church. Politically, the only issues Luther concerned himself with was he wished to have a separation of the church and state, that secular rulers should rule secular matters, and the same for the church. He suggested that neither should have a say about one...
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